2007.12.12 15:04

Korean Adoptees

I got really into reading Relative Choices blog on NYtimes recently. http://relativechoices.blogs.nytimes.com/

I knew there were many Korean Adoptees (KAD, a new lingo I learned from this blog), yet I am surprised at the proportion of KAD writers, commentors, and adoptive parents on this blog. Plus comments by Korean-Americans and Korean nationals like myself, I have never seen a discussion like this on a major American media.

List of interesting posts:

http://relativechoices.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/tracing-my-roots-back-to-korea/
This was very touching. The picture made me teary from the first thing in the morning. Also check comment #37 by the author.

http://relativechoices.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/12/04/blood-ties-and-acts-of-love/
This paragraph made me think about the issue of "racial" and "cultural identity".
Even though I hope to someday bring our child to Korea to meet extended biological kin, my husband and I cannot provide all of the skills needed to be effective in that culture. We don’t speak Korean in the home; nor do we cook Korean food regularly. Although we have become very knowledgeable about Korean culture and have connections to the Korean-American community, I wonder about our ability to nurture our child’s racial and cultural identity.
http://relativechoices.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/11/13/who-are-you-also-known-as/
My personal awakening to the losses of adoption began in my late adolescence when I became aware that strangers assumed I was not an American because I did not have blond hair and blue eyes or assumed I spoke Korean (or Chinese or Japanese) or complimented me on my English.
This part sounded strange for me, because I met some people who were surprised to find that I can read and write (or IM) in another language. Maybe I remember those comments more than the opposite ones.
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